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Goddard Hosts "Gastro-nauts"

Goddard Hosts “Gastro-nauts”

I love astronaut ice cream – that freeze-dried, crispy block of strawberry, vanilla, and chocolate sugary sweetness that melts on your tongue into something that vaguely resembles melted ice cream. Though it was developed for the Apollo program, I was disappointed to find out that it wasn’t very popular and … Continue Reading →


Blueshift ponders... what's next in space exploration?

Blueshift ponders… what’s next in space exploration?

This past weekend, I attended an unconference called SpaceUP DC, which drew together space enthusiasts from near and far to talk about the future of space exploration and advocacy. It’s an “unconference” because it’s not like a regular professional conference – it’s much more free-form, and attendees determine the structure, … Continue Reading →


JWST @ NYC, and art mysteries solved!

JWST @ NYC, and art mysteries solved!

I’ve lived in Maryland almost two years, just a short train ride away from New York City, and only recently ventured up to the Big Apple. It was for the World Science Festival, where I was volunteering at the full-scale model of the James Webb Space Telescope. The full-scale model … Continue Reading →


Clear Skies in La Palma

Clear Skies in La Palma

  • By Koji Mukai
  • August 25, 2010
  • Comments Off on Clear Skies in La Palma

I’m a new blogger for Blueshift – I work for the Japanese-US Suzaku X-ray astronomy project here at Goddard, and have done education and outreach related works over the years. I used to do ground-based optical observations, so I decided to write about my visits to the international observatory on … Continue Reading →


Beijing's Ancient Observatory

Beijing’s Ancient Observatory

I just got back from a trip to Beijing, China, which was a very interesting experience. Beijing seems to me to be a study in contrasts – ancient, yet very much rebuilt. Structures from the 15th century Ming Dynasty lasted for centuries, and some still exist today, yet later conflicts … Continue Reading →


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Meteor Crater

Faith recently blogged about the meteor strike that killed the dinosaurs. That may have been the Big One, but the Earth has gotten hit by meteors plenty of other times. Meteor Crater is east of Flagstaff in the Arizona desert. It’s nearly 3/4 of a mile across! It was created … Continue Reading →


How To Kill A Dinosaur From Space

How To Kill A Dinosaur From Space

Go ahead and take a moment to think back to those blissful years of childhood, all those mandatory naps and the impish grins that let you get away with anything. Ah, the good old days. Well, I’m willing to venture a guess that right about the time that the sand … Continue Reading →


Looking to Lani in Hawaii

Looking to Lani in Hawaii

Hello Blueshift readers! I’m a new blogger here, and want to briefly introduce myself. I’m a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow here at Goddard, which means that I spend most of my time studying the universe. Ok, maybe that’s too broad…more specifically, I’m an astronomer in the field of observational cosmology; … Continue Reading →


Pilgrimage to Greenwich

Pilgrimage to Greenwich

I’m Jim Lochner, and I lead the education and public outreach effort within the Astrophysics Science Division at NASA/GSFC.  Maggie and Sara invited me to write a guest blog as part of the science travel series. Earlier this summer my wife and I took a vacation to London.  One item … Continue Reading →


Ancient Astronomy in Mexico

Ancient Astronomy in Mexico

Several years ago, I was fortunate enough to travel to Mexico. I visited several sites with ancient ruins. One of them was Chichen Itza. The night we were at Chichen Itza, we witnessed a lunar eclipse over it – I have no pics, unfortunately! Built sometime in the 7th century … Continue Reading →


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